Sunday, January 26, 2020Light Snow -5°C
Arts

Live in the Lost @ Warren G Flowers Gallery

Posted by Jer / February 23, 2010

20100223live.jpg
One of our intrepid readers is also an intrepid writer. Marianne Perron is a lover of art, movies, books, bars, food, etc. who blogs more regularly over at Grasshopper Reads. She kindly sent us this review of a gallery exhibit at Dawson College by artists Emily Shanahan and Corina Kennedy called Live in the Lost

Liminal, fragmented, disconnected. Live in the lost sandwiches existence between the past and the present, alluding to a cultivated nostalgia that is made intelligent by distance. As a whole, the exhibition questions what it is to be present, complete, missing.

From the classical references in Shanahan's study, to the avant-garde perdu in Kennedy's 77 Yoko Ono Hair Pieces, the work moves through a non-linear timeline and carries into each era a notion of the fractured; many of the pieces fail to be complete in the traditional sense, and although selected pieces appear to form clusters in time, there is no overarching progression to define the experience. What then begins to appear is a hint of time - more specifically the "past" - as both here and gone, minus the measurement of how far gone, and how exactly here. The paradoxical imperative, live in the lost, becomes increasingly attainable; as the live (adjective) locates itself within that which has slipped away, it pulls the whole brouhaha within mind's reach. And yet, the lost here is not exclusively temporal.

As one examines individual pieces, the pattern becomes prominent. Things are missing here. Limbs, faces, life - even Yoko Ono. The art, then, becomes a study of what constitutes a whole; and the question of whether life is carried on in the severed appendages teases the viewer.

Shanahan especially investigates this theme. Many of her classical inspired paintings feature statuesque figures and sculptural renditions from which key parts have been removed. Crumbled and eroded by time; or broken off by the artist? Both possibilities are entertained as one moves through the analogous representation of representation. Within this dialogue, an exploration of horror and darkness begins to emerge. The duo Head of Alexander and Head of Athena flatten and wash out once corporeal sculptures. The result: eerie and vacant glimpses into celebrated mythology. The disembodiment, then, becomes symbolic rather than incidental.

If Shanahan is concerned with enabling discourse between the classical and contemporary, Kennedy reconfigures the iconic. An interest in the fragmented is present alongside an investment in the effects of repetition, both acutely addressed in the aforementioned 77 Yoko Ono Hair Pieces. The sprawling arrangement is comprised of 77 black and white paintings on identical blocks of wood, forming a seemingly random pattern, the result of which is a rather arresting checkerboard portrait of that very famous hair. Individually, the pieces vary in texture, ratio, and complexity. Some are simple - nearly entirely black or white, unintriguing in their monotony. Others are complex to the point of creating optical illusions, poetic in their rendition. Together they challenge identity and the absolute, playing with the multiplicity that constitutes the individual and, cleverly, hair. Kennedy's paintings often take on a haunting quality that remains like an imprint upon the eye; the allusions in her work must be deciphered, at other times they seem entirely private.

Live in the Lost is on at the Warren G. Flowers Art Gallery,
Dawson College, 4001 de Maisonneuve Ouest,
through February 27.

Extra special thanks to Marianne Perron for this post.

Discussion

8 Comments

Rreshu / February 4, 2015 at 12:29 am
user-pic
If you dig up the back yard you'll find the remains of the tsdohanus of RB that didn't quite make the grade. They lacked the fighting spirit if you will. Some were drowned, others hung, even shot. What a son of a bitch!!
auto insurance quotes Kansas City / April 1, 2015 at 08:43 am
user-pic
it best -- articulating something I'd noticed better than I ever could have; he said that Bush's face never matches the words that are coming out of his mouth. He's talking about war and death and terrorism and he's got this self-satisfied smile plastered across his face.It's literally as if he's saying, "Don't cha get it? Don't cha understand what's going on? They hate us because we love freedom!" (or replace the freedom comment with one of the thousands of other inane assertions his 4th-grade mind has made over the past several years.)
kanchipuramsarees / January 23, 2019 at 11:26 pm
user-pic
Nice post
kanchipuramsarees / January 23, 2019 at 11:26 pm
user-pic
Nice post
golu dolls / January 23, 2019 at 11:26 pm
user-pic
Nice post
herbal powder / January 23, 2019 at 11:27 pm
user-pic
Nice post

Add a Comment

Other Cities: Toronto