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Arts

Fraternal Twins

Posted by Jasia / November 12, 2010

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Wednesday night at 5em Salle was the opening night of Jumeaux, a dual choreographic venture between Québec's Harold Rhéaume and France's Yvann Alexandre. If you want to catch this unique project that brings together not just two choreographers but also their respective Quebecois/French teams, Jumeaux runs until the 14th of this month.

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Actually, only the last of the three works presented at Jumeaux is a joint work, which is preceded by two individual works. I have to say that the first piece, Harold Rhéaume's L'Autre was a bit too predictable. While the worn-out zombie atmosphere was interesting to begin with, as was the dynamic of three dancers who seem to be always working towards different configurations of twosome-ness, it wasn't enough to keep me interested.

The second work, again a solo project, this time by Yvann Alexandre entitled Homogene duo felt more complete, more specific. Opening with a very sci-fi atmosphere, the piece continued on a weird and dark narrative that was surprising; something about glowing red faceless bodies writhing on the floor was just too awesomely inappropriate for contemporary dance. Combining this with some scenes in which the dancers seemed to be swimming is reminded me more than a little of Werner Herzog's Wild Blue Yonder, putting things that shouldn't really work together in a way that is surprisingly satisfying and keeps you on your toes.

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Les Fractions, the long awaited duo work in which both choreographers and teams work together. This piece was more restrained than Homogene duo, and while it did have some nice moments, especially at the beginning when the dancers interacted with projected light as if it were a physical object, it still felt a bit less specific than it could have been.

Overall, there were some very nice things about this production; the lighting in particularly was very well handled and the sound really controlled the pace of the show in an effective manner. But the presentation of solo works before the collaborative one did not make for a very holistic experience, more of a compare and contrast exercise between the two choreographers' distinctive styles. There was also something tiring about the pace of the dancer's bodies being pushed continuously through space without any real break in the relentless movement. I get it, they are dancing, but it would have been nice if there were more moments where the dance became something other than just dance and the audience was offered a little more to hold onto.


Image credits: David Cannon

Discussion

8 Comments

Zeke / November 13, 2010 at 11:25 am
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Howdy!

A) The show only goes until the 13th (tonight) and B) If you want to hear our discussion with Yvann Alexandre try this:
http://movement-museum.blogspot.com/
Jasia / November 13, 2010 at 12:48 pm
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Thanks for the correction and link, my mistake! I will certainly check out the discussion.
kanchipuramsarees / January 21, 2019 at 11:55 pm
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nice post
kanchipuramsarees / January 21, 2019 at 11:55 pm
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nice post
golu dolls / January 21, 2019 at 11:55 pm
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nice post
herbal powder / January 21, 2019 at 11:55 pm
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nice post

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