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Weekend Playlist Podcast

The Midnight Poutine Podcast - Dec. 5-12, 2013

Posted by Greg / December 6, 2013

Smiley faceWe're entering the final stretch of 2013 but not letting up one bit. This week, we say goodbye to Montreal scene fixtures Sweet Mother Logic. We also talk about the beautiful sounds of Erik Lind & The Orchard, Emma Frank, Lindi Ortega, and Sean Nicholas Savage, then get rowdy with Hiroshima Shadows and Canadian grindcore legends Fuck the Facts. As always, it's a mixed bag -- the delicious kind.

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Here's your Midnight Poutine Podcast:

Emma Frank - Stormy Season
Erik Lind & The Orchard - Great White North
MGMT - Electric Feel (Justice remix)
TV Ghost - Five Colors Blind
Sean Nicholas Savage - She Looks Like You
Sweet Mother Logic - Natural History
Bare Mutants - I Suck at Life
Lindi Ortega - Lead Me On
No Joy - Second Spine
Hiroshima Shadows - March and June
Lemon Bucket Orkestra - Odessa Bulgarish
Fuck The Facts - Le Tete hors de L'eau

Picture of Sweet Mother Logic taken from their website.

Discussion

5 Comments

intensedebate.com / January 29, 2014 at 01:52 am
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Igniabel / February 4, 2015 at 08:12 am
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extinction is inevitable in said poerid of time Let me answer your question by first asking a question of my own: If everyone learned for certain that the Earth only had 20 years left before all life on it ended, what would be the point of parents doing the hard work of continuing to parent their children? Shouldn't they all just give up?Sadly, I do think, if such news was delivered, more of that kind of thing would happen than most would like to admit. But keeping it the context of a thought experiment, I think we can all agree that giving up on parenting would be an absurd notion under such circumstances. And the reason we nearly all see it this way is because we nearly all recognize that parenting is a labor of love. Parents don't parent solely for what they think the end result will be. There are all kinds of other joys along the way that make every second worth it. So much so, in fact, that if a parent knew that she/he only had 20 years left, she/he would likely put more attention and hard work into parenting, not less. After all, how better to spend one's last days on Earth?Likewise, folks who are today the most passionate about being conservationists would give you many reasons for what they do, most of which would still apply even if they thought the world was going to end in their lifetimes. For a partial list: they enjoy the beauty of wild places untamed by human development; they enjoy knowing that at least a few animal species other than humans are allowed to live in their natural habitats; they enjoy eating foods grown without chemicals because they taste better and make them feel more nourished; they enjoy knowing they're only using what they need, even though they could easily use more; they enjoy the peace of mind and simplicity that usually accompanies living a sustainable life The list could go on. But really, forget about passionate conservationists for a moment. Wouldn't TONS of people want to spend at least a bit of their withering time on Earth visiting the wild places that they know are about to disappear forever? Furthermore, if, upon hearing that there were only 20 years to go, some folks took chain saws and started cutting down an old forest just for fun since it doesn't matter anymore anyway wouldn't most people find this objectionable, because they'd actually like to enjoy that forest with some of the rest of the time they have left?Point being I don't think I'm actually alone in thinking like this. Yeah, I suppose if a person sees their conservation efforts as hard work , they'd see no point in doing it anymore if they somehow knew it wouldn't achieve the specific goals they’d been aiming for. But for some folks these efforts are rife with every-day meaning and don't feel like work at all. For them, the work for the last 20 years might become even more meaningful, not less.
More Info / March 29, 2016 at 08:24 am
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